The 100-Mile Goal

Training Plan to do a 100 mile bike ride

Before starting any training plan consult your doctor by obtaining a full physical examination.

In order to be successful on the bike you must be physically and mentally prepared to overcome the challenges of riding a bike. When you ride keep training logs of your miles take into consideration the following:

  • Course
  • Weather
  • Intensity (hills, intervals, steady pace, etc.)
  • Elapsed time
  • Mileage
  • Average speed
  • An assessment of how you felt
  • Stretching time

Mile 185 during a 600K

Keep a log next to your bike so that you can add the information as soon as you are back from a ride. This should take less than 2 minutes. The information you collect will give you specific data of your progress, it will keep you motivated and it will help you avoid overtraining.

Now, how many miles should you ride? When should you start? What is an easy day and what is a hard day? What are intervals? How often should I ride? Many questions like these and more will arise as you start your plan. The following plan is a general plan for the person who wants to finish a century for the first time.

Increasing mileage to your training should be proportional with your fitness level. As a general rule of thumb, increase mileage by 5% – 10% each week, if you have been cycling regularly. It is best to start as soon as you decide you want to ride 100 miles, 12 weeks before is recommended assuming you have had base miles of about 40 – 50 miles a week.

In order to define intensity, divide up your efforts into zones 1 – 4.

Zone 1, an easy day is a leisurely ride that will help you rest, warm up or cool down.

Zone 2, a ride at the pace you will ride the century. This is when knowing the average speed of your long distance bike rides come into play.

Zone 3, it’s the speed faster than your century pace. This becomes the pace you do during intervals.

Zone 4, it’s the maximal effort you can do in a small amount of time 10 seconds to 30 seconds.

Once your zones are defined you can easily create different workout plans for yourself. Always dedicate one day for long rides, one day for zone 4 rides, one day for zone 3 rides and a combination of zones rides.

Incorporate strength training and stretching days to be more successful with your plan. Interval training is defined as a workout with periods of zone 4 or Zone 3 intensity and zone 1 or 2 intensity as recovery. For example an interval to improve speed; warm up for 15 minutes followed by 1 minute of pedaling at zone 4, recover at zone 1 for 2 minutes, repeat 5 times and finish with a cool down. This workout is about 45 minutes, 15 minutes for a warm up, 15 minutes of intervals and 15 minutes of cool-down. Increase repetitions every week for three weeks by adding 2 repetitions each week. After the 3 weeks allow for one week of less intense work so that your body can recover and grow stronger.

Ride 5 to 6 times a week even if some days are only 10 miles. Neurologically your body will adjust to the regimen and advance to a higher level. Physiologically, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules in muscle cells are split to release energy that enables the muscles to contract, however muscles respond to the commands from the central nervous system. Therefore, mind and body is a powerful connection that cannot be undermined. During high intensity workouts as it occurs during an event your mind will overpower your muscles to give that last “push” to fulfill your goal.

I highly recommend hiring an experienced cycling coach to help you attain the best results. Hire a coach in your area who can help you define your zones and accurately prepare a training plan for your success, in the mean time you can start with the following plan.

Monday: Recover from the weekend long ride by either taking a yoga class, riding no more than 10 miles or go to the gym and lift weights for your upper body and core only. Rest the legs!

Tuesday: Do hill interval lasting between 20 seconds to 45 seconds and rest for one minute in between hill repeats. Start with 4 hill repeats. Pick a hill that is 3% to 5% incline. As training increases, add two hill repeats each week until you reach 10 hill repeats as your maximum. This will be considered lower body and core training.

Wednesday: Easy 10 – 20 miles, pick loop near your home to do at your zone 1 pace. This will also help you mentally, especially at mile 90 during your century ride, to give you the last “push” needed to complete your first century.  Another option could be to take the day off and stretch for about 30 minutes or go for a 30 minute walk.

Thursday: Lift weights and ride for about one hour at zone 2, with warm-up and cool down at zone 1.

Friday: Mentally prepare for your long ride on Saturday and ride for about 1 to 2 hours at zones 1 and 2. If you are sore from lifting weights the previous day ride at zone 1 to allow for your body to recover.

Saturday: Go for a club ride where you will be able to chit-chat most of the ride, with its occasional fast pace lines at zone 3. If the pace is too fast for your training, slow down. Another pace line might be just around the corner. The Saturday ride should be fun and taxing to your body. Use it as the day to experiment with food, take note of the amount of water you need, discover favorite foods, find out about equipment positioning, etc. The Saturday rides should be between 40 to 75 mile rides every weekend. The more time you spend on the bike, the easier it will be to ride 100 miles

Sunday: rest day or easy 10-25 miles at zone 1. Keep it short so that you can enjoy the rest of the day with family or friends.

The following matrix shows the recommended miles you should attain as the week progresses. Note the accumulated total miles for the week is based on a gradual progression; week 4 stays with the same total miles as week 3 to help the body adjust to the training. In some instances the total mileage increases but the daily riding miles varies according to the intensity. Some days you might need recovery at the end of the week instead of the beginning of the week. One of the main aspects to keep in mind when training is to listen to your body, if it’s too sore then rest, choose proper meals to recover, a healthy choice of fresh vegetables and fruits can help you recover faster than a greasy meal. If you are gaining weight instead of maintain you current weight or decreasing weight then you might not be fueling your body properly. Injuries and a lack of interest to ride your bike might arise as a consequence of not listening to your body.

Sample of Training Plan to finish a 100 mile ride

Week M T W Th F Sat. Sun. Total miles for the week
1 0 10 12 10 0 30 12 74
2 0 10 12 5 10 35 10 82
3 0 10 10 5 10 40 10 85
4 0 10 15 10 10 40 0 85
5 0 15 15 10 10 45 15 110
6 10 15 20 10 10 50 15 130
7 5 15 20 10 12 50 15 127
8 0 20 20 10 15 60 15 140
9 10 20 25 15 20 55 10 155
10 10 20 20 20 20 70 0 160
11 10 20 25 20 20 65 10 170
12 0 20 25 20 10 65 20 160
Week of the Race 0 20 10 10 10 100 10 160
Zone 1 Zone 3- 4 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 2 Zone 2 Zone 1

 

Written originally for Marin Cyclists Club by Susan Scarlet-Macaw (Forsman), Exercise Physiologist and USA Cycling Coach II (2005-2009)

Are you Fed Up?

After watching the movie, Fed Up, a recommendation from my brother, I was almost in tears and then anger, both emotions that have led me in a constructive way to create a program and continue writing my workbook 30 Days to Wellness. I want to be part of the solution. I always try to do be good to my body, it has endure much and it has given me so much more. The least I can do is give it a plant-based diet, a nice workout and a calming point of view.

Join the Challenge: Processed Food Detox for 10 days. It’s time to take care of our bodies in a way that most food manufacturers do not want us to take care of ourselves. Heck, I’m even guilty of it… As a Pepsi drinker and a two cookies a day eater, it will be a challenge for me. I’ve shown you in the past, choose fresh vegetables and fruits and I have even turned vegan and found vegan cookies, but for the health of the world, it is my responsibility to involve more people into change. This is a change for the 2020 generation. The recommended guideline is to reduce sugar consumption from processed food to less than 10% of the total energy intake per day. And to further reduce it by 5% about 6 teaspoons per day.

My wish list is for people who are nutritionally malnourished to get better food options, for people who are inactive to get 30 minutes of activity everyday, for people who are stressed and anxious to meditate for 5 minutes daily. It has helped me and it can help you too.

It’s all preventable. Start today…

Join the Challenge: Processed Food Detox for 10 Days. When you contact me, I will send a PDF of 20 recipes that you can cook in less than 30 minutes.

From Values to Vision

Webster’s Dictionary
noun vi·sion \ˈvi-zhən\
: the ability to see : sight or eyesight
: something that you imagine : a picture that you see in your mind
: something that you see or dream especially as part of a religious or supernatural experience

For our purpose, to explore in the class From Values to Vision, we will look at the meaning of “something that you imagine : a picture that you see in your mind” 

Sample of a Vision Board

Are you curious about growing your awareness, develop a new skill, live a healthier life style, challenge yourself in a new sport, excel in a favorite hobby, gain physical mobility, improve your wellness, or create new connections? So often, people seek a change but are unaware of taking the time to look first at what they really want before starting into action of making a change. One way to get started is to re-evaluate your values. What top five or ten values are a “must have” in your life? Once you develop a sense of those values you can start with The Vision Board to help you set the stage to how and what you want in your future and the behavioral changes that you might need to implement to get to your vision.

Our next Class will be held on May 30th 2015. For more details fill the contact form. or text (775) 241-8405. $40 per person, sliding scale available. Bring magazines and/or images that inspire you, other materials will be provided.

Transformational Coaching with Susan

MyEandW-wheelMy aspiration for creating a 12 Week Transformational Coaching program is to provide a guide that can help you start a new point of view towards your health and wellness. It all starts with learning about you using the My Exercise and Wellness Wheel. For as little as $25 a week you can start a life of satisfaction and happiness. There are plenty of ways to start a happier more desired life. I have learned to live a fuller life by trusting myself first. We are all interconnected and learn similarly. I started by trusting myself and by connecting with my body through exercise and mindful awareness I have awaken my potential.

Allow me to help you discover the goodness and beauty in you!

How does it work?

We set up an appointment to talk online or in person. I explain the My Exercise and Wellness Wheel and how you fit in that wheel. If there is something where I can help you or if there is an area outside of my expertise then I recommend a specialist for you.

What do I get out of it?

You will receive SMART goals with an exercise guide with the following:

  1. Physical activity exercises to improve many areas of your health:
    1. Strength Training
    2. Aerobic Exercise
    3. Flexibility
    4. Weight Loss
    5. Stress Management and Relaxation
  2. Five minute mindful exercises to help you focus
  3. Guidelines for proper eating habits
  4. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bound goals
  5. A set of elastic bands from SKLZ for a total body workout
  6. Assessments for your Quality of Life
  7. 12 one to one visits at the convenience of your home.
  8. Journal to track your exercises and more

Where can I do the sessions?

  1. You can start the sessions from your home, Ogden and surrounding areas or via Skype. We set a time that is convenient with your schedule.

When should you see results?

  1. In 4 weeks.

Continue reading

Staying Motivated with a Coach

Coaching is a subject close to my heart because it has helped me stay motivated. I’ve had running coaches, a cycling coach and a triathlon coach whom have helped me when I wanted to get better in my sports. I also have a psychologist who guides me to continue to have a positive outlook. All the advice I have received has been to have a positive attitude during good and difficult times. I have learned that by being kinder towards myself I have become happier, more effective and motivated. These have helped me to become kinder and better in my relationships with other people too. This is a plus, especially knowing that we are all interconnected.

Coaching has many uses, but mainly it helps us with staying with goals that we want to achieve. I believe that the best way to ensure kindness and compassion towards oneself when choosing what goals to accomplish is to try the best we can and create stepping stones with percentages to reach desired goals. For example, committing to exercise 6 days a week for 30 minutes each day and attain 80% of that goal. You will still be within the guidelines of exercising most days of the week for at least 150 minutes at moderate intensity.

A coach helps by listening about your personal beliefs and guides you to make behavior and lifestyle changes. A coach helps see the client the contrasting behaviors of a particular lifestyle. For example, in instances when you eat a lot; the consequences could be indigestion, weigh gain, and less mobility. If you do not want to feel poorly about your health then you will try to be aware of your behavior and change it. It is not easy, but a coach can help you stay focused and teach you how to be kind and disciplined during your time of transformation. More importantly, you need to be kind to yourself, after all you are developing habits within yourself to become more self-reliant and stronger through life’s ups and downs.

Coaching relates to your overall wellness and the little things you can do for yourself to be kind and compassionate. Even reaching 80% of a goal is better than 50%. When you are kind to yourself then you are able to share that experience with others. Even if you are not the sharing type of person, I have learned that spending more time in nature and in silence to relax recharges me. I LOVE running because it allows me to feel my body, to hear nature and at times it provides the mental relaxation in order to focus on the goals I choose to pursue.

Now that we are 4 days into the new year, make more conscious choices about positive habits you want flowing into your mind. Don’t forget to avoid negative people or thoughts that bring hurtful judgements into your mind. Old habits will always lurk in your mind but if you explore your mind with kindness and compassion you can attain new healthy habits.

You do not have to do it alone, ask a friend for help, hire a therapist, hire a coach. You are worth the investment of your time on yourself. When you step outside of your comfort zone there is a chance of making a mistake, maybe you start your exercise program too quickly or you start a romantic relationship too early in your healing process after a break up, either way, see it as an opportunity to learn about you and use what you learn to avoid making the same mistakes again.

Be your own coach with kindness, compassion and respect. The world is full of beauty, enjoy it!

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